Creating Contiguous Open Space Corridors

}
09 - 21 - 22
The four waterways that converge in downtown Dayton flow through parks and neighborhoods all over the city. Many of these corridors host our bikeways—part of…

The four waterways that converge in downtown Dayton flow through parks and neighborhoods all over the city. Many of these corridors host our bikeways—part of the nation’s largest off-road trail network—linking regional towns and attractions along hundreds of miles of trail. These rivers offer beautiful places to relax, play and exercise just a short walk from many homes, businesses, and attractions in the city.

Currently however, some places along our river corridors lack public open space along the waterways. People can’t reach the water. Where they can, there are no amenities. Much of the Wolf Creek is inaccessible to dense neighborhoods in West Dayton. A series of parks along the east side of the Stillwater River north of downtown serve the adjacent residents, but the dense neighborhoods on the west side of the river have no access. The bikeway runs along both sides of the Great Miami River downtown, but it’s difficult to find a way down to the riverbank. This restricts opportunities that the rivers offer to Dayton’s residents, workers, students and visitors.

The Dayton Riverfront Plan expands our open space along the rivers. Contiguous public access to bikeways, trails, fishing spots and river put-ins, as well as picnic shelters and open areas are the key to unleashing the potential of our waterways for everyone. The Plan envisions expanding DeWeese Park and the Stillwater Bikeway across the river to serve the Riverdale and North Riverdale neighborhoods. Also envisioned is building the bikeway and expanding open space up both sides of the Wolf Creek and a pedestrian promenade along the east bank of the Great Miami River, from near Sinclair College to OnMain and the University of Dayton. Creating public parks and open spaces on our waterways is a foundational ambition of the Riverfront Plan, and the work has already begun.

Send these updates to your inbox

News

Strengthening Connections to the River

Dayton’s flood control system is the envy of the world. After the Great Flood of 1913, the Miami Conservancy District was formed with a system of five dry dams, ground-breaking engineering and hundreds of miles of levees which have kept the region safe from high water...

Spring 2022 Progress Report

The vibrant redevelopment of downtown is spilling up, down, and over our rivers to Dayton’s neighborhoods along all points of the compass. The Dayton Riverfront Plan continues to spur on this evolution. The Third Street Bridge has reopened; the Gem City Market is...

Reclaiming Dayton’s Roadways for Pedestrians

In 1911, the Olmstead Brothers, sons of Fredrick Law Olmstead, the Father of Landscape Architecture, laid out Dayton’s System of Parks and Parkways. In that design, the Olmstead Brothers envisioned ribbons of parks along our rivers. Motorists could drive the parks’...